Recent Calls
Sun. Aug 4th 2019
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The South Beloit Fire Department was dispatched for a structure fire on South Bluff Street on August 4th, 2019 at 12:37am. First in units encountered heavy smoke coming from the house. Upon entry, cre...
Sun. Jul 7th 2019
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Shortly before 3 AM on Sunday, July 7th 2019, Quint 2052 and Chief Davenport were called mutual aid to the Town of Beloit for a structure fire. Photos courtesy of George Bower Fire/Rescue Photography.
Fri. Jun 8th 2018
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The South Beloit Fire Department was dispatched for a structure fire on Misty Meadow Lane on June 8th, 2018 at 4:10am. A neighbor passing by spotted the fire, called 911, then knocked on the door to w...
Sun. Jun 3rd 2018
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The South Beloit Fire Department was dispatched for a structure fire at 666 S Bluff St #Lot 307 on June 3rd, 2018 at 3:37am. First arriving units found a fully involved mobile home. Command immediatel...
Tue. May 8th 2018
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The South Beloit Fire Department was dispatched for a two vehicle accident at the intersection of Gardner St and Willowbrook Rd on May 8th, 2018 at 2:07pm. Chief Davenport arrived on scene with the So...
News Headlines
Mon. Sep 28th 2020
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Fire at 201 Wheeler Ave Press Release
Wed. Sep 9th 2020
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Last night at the city council meeting Dan Zerfass was sworn in as the next chief of the South Beloit Fire Department. Chief Zerfass has been chief since September 1st, but was finally able to be swor...
Tue. Sep 8th 2020
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Congratulations to Firefighter Austin Edgington on passing his National Registry Emergency Medical Technician-Basic exam. We are proud of all your hard work and dedication, working towards your EMT ce...
Wed. Aug 26th 2020
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Most of you know that Chief Michael Davenport will be retiring on Monday, August 31st after 33 years with the South Beloit Fire Department. All of us are sad to see him leave, but wish him an amazing ...
Wed. Aug 26th 2020
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Last night 3 new part-time Firefighters were sworn into the South Beloit Department.Probationary Firefighter/EMT Lorianne Lynch, Badge #349Probationary Firefighter Jay Price, Badge #350Probationary Fi...

 

SOUTH BELOIT FIRE DEPARTMENT

"A System Dedicated To Saving Lives"

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Put A Freeze on Winter Fires

Put A Freeze on Winter Fires logo

Heating, holiday decorations, winter storms and candles all contribute to an increased risk of fire during the winter months. NFPA and the U.S. Fire Administration are teaming up to help reduce your risk to winter fires and other hazards, including carbon monoxide and electrical fires.

 

 

Heating

Heating is the second leading cause of U.S. home fires, deaths and injuries. December, January and February are the peak months for heating fires. Space heaters are the type of equipment most often involved in home heating equipment fires, figuring in two of every five fires (40%). 



Dan Doofus learns some important safety lessons about home heating.

 

Carbon Monoxide

Often called the invisible killer, carbon monoxide (CO) is an odorless, colorless gas created when fuels such as gasoline, wood, coal, propane, etc. do not burn completely. In the home, heating and cooking equipment that burn fuel are potential sources of CO. Carbon monoxide incidents are more common during the winter months, and in residential properties. 

 

Winter storms

Most of the U.S. is at risk for winter storms, which can cause dangerous and sometimes life-threatening conditions. Blinding wind-driven snow, extreme cold, icy road conditions, downed trees and power lines can all wreak havoc on our daily schedules. Home fires occur more in the winter than in any other season, and heating equipment is involved in one of every six reported home fires, and one in every five home fire deaths.

 

Generators

Portable generators are useful during power outages, however, many homeowners are unaware that the improper use of portable generators can be risky. The most common dangers associated with portable generators are carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning, electrical shock or electrocution, and fire hazards. According to a 2013 Consumer Product Safety Commission report, half of the generator-related deaths happened in the four coldest months of the year, November through February, and portable generators were involved in the majority of carbon monoxide deaths involving engine-driven tools. 

 

Candles

December is the peak time of year for home candle fires; the top two days for home candle fires are Christmas and Christmas Eve. Each year between 2013-2017, an average of 7,900 home candle fires were reported each year.

 

Electrical

Electrical home fires are a leading cause of home fires in the U.S. Roughly half of all  home electrical fires involved electrical distribution or lighting equipment, while nearly another half involved other known types of equipment like washer or dryer fans, and portable or stationary space heaters.

 

Christmas tree & decoration fires

Carefully decorating your home can help make your holidays safer. Between 2014-2018, U.S. fire departments responded to an average of 160 home fires that started with Christmas trees per year. U.S. fire departments responded to an estimated average of 770 home structure fires per year that began with decorations, excluding Christmas trees.

 

 

Christmas tree disposal
Christmas trees are combustible items that become increasingly flammable as they continue to dry out in your home. More than one-quarter (29%) of home fires that begin with Christmas trees occur in January. Although Christmas tree fires are not common, when they do occur they’re much more likely to be serious.

 

 


A live Christmas tree burn conducted by the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) shows just how quickly a dried out Christmas tree fire burns, with flashover occurring in less than one minute, as compared to a well-watered tree, which burns at a much slower rate.

 

 

 


It's time to deck the halls, but follow NFPA's simple safety tips to help keep yourself and your family and friends safer from fire.

 

 


NFPA's lovable Dan Doofus shows you how to have a fire-safe holiday with a few simple safety tips.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

Smoke Detector Program

 

The South Beloit Fire Department is helping residents in South Beloit make their families safer from the dangers of smoke and fire thanks to First Alert.

In June, First Alert, the most trusted brand in home safety, launch its "60 Years of Thank Yous" sweepstakes to mark the 60th anniversary of the company's founding. South Beloit Fire Department is one of 60 fire departments randomly selected from hundreds of entrants to win 60 smoke alarms to help with community risk reduction initiatives.

If you are having issues with a smoke detector in your home and it is not an emergency, please call the fire department non-emergency number at 815-389-3097 and we will come to your home with a new smoke detector free of charge. If you smell smoke or see fire, please exit your house immediately and call 911.

 

 

 

 


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